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Why 3D Entertainment isn’t for Everyone

3D viewingMany of today’s adults had seized each and every opportunity to catch the latest 3D movie as they were growing up. These same people, excited to share the joy of such advanced films with their families, may be surprised to discover that 3D entertainment now holds far more than the magic they had once experienced; they hold power to cause nausea and dizziness that prevents full entertainment value.

Have you noticed that your ability to get into 3D entertainment has diminished as you have gotten older? It’s not because you lack your childhood joy for the living; it is much more likely that the problem is your eyes.

How 3D Works

3D works by overlapping images. This is a subtle overlap, but just enough to change the way images are interpreted by the brain. The original form of 3D imaging is already in place in the eyes. If you look only through one eye at a time, you will observe this. See how each eye has its subtle differential in how your environment appears? That is the basis of 3D films.

How 3D is Made

To recreate what occurs naturally when the eyes take in information and send it to the brain, 3D flicks are filmed in the same fashion that we see in “real life.” Two lenses are used, and they are set a few inches apart. This mimics the set of the eyes on the average face. So, when the film is then projected onto the big screen, what is present are two slightly different views. If you were to try to look at the screen with the naked eye, images would be blurred. That is why special glasses are worn.

Where the Mixup Occurs

For the eyes, which naturally overlap views, to observe a 3D film, there needs to be the consistent binocular vision. This is not a condition; it is a term that expresses how the eyes work in harmony. Even with the special polarized glasses that are provided, inconsistency in the collaboration between eyes creates a challenge. The brain cannot successfully interpret images, which sets up the prime conditions for nausea and dizziness.

Does your ability to enjoy a 3D film affect your normal, everyday vision? Fortunately, no. You just may have to skip the next fight between King Kong and Godzilla!

 

Posted in: Eye Health

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